MAILLARD REACTION

The sear on your ribeye steak? That’s the Maillard reaction.

The color of your toast? Maillard.

The crisp edges on your fried egg? That’s it, too.

MAILLARD REACTION

The sear on your ribeye steak? That’s the Maillard reaction.

The color of your toast? Maillard.

The crisp edges on your fried egg? That’s it, too.

MAILLARD REACTION

The sear on your ribeye steak?
That’s the Maillard reaction.

The color of your toast?
Maillard.

The crisp edges on your fried egg?
That’s it, too.

The Maillard reaction is named after Louis-Camille Maillard, a French chemist who was studying the “browning effect” in 1912. Essentially, the Maillard reaction is responsible for the flavors and aromas created when food is heated enough that the amino acids (the building blocks of proteins) and carbohydrates (the building blocks of sugars) start to dance together, resulting in complex flavor that would be impossible without prolonged exposure to high heat. During the process, the surface of the food starts to brown and get crunchy. It develops a richness and depth of flavor and texture that cannot be produced by wet cooking methods like steaming or braising.

The list of foods improved by the Maillard reaction is endless and different foods react in distinct ways. Both Filet Mignon and cookies undergo the Maillard reaction, but they look, smell, and taste vastly different from each other. Because of the Maillard reaction: steaks develop their richly flavorful surface; brisket builds a bark; crust forms on loaves of bread; dark beer gets a clandestine flavor; and beans are transformed into coffee and chocolate. These reactions are a chemical equation that equals mouthwatering results.

Maillard Reaction Flavors
Maillard Reaction Flavors

What begins as a simple reaction becomes more complicated as the hundreds of different flavor compounds created during the reaction interact and break down to form yet more flavor compounds — all of which contribute to the taste and aroma of the food. Done right, the reward is beautiful food with maximum flavor. Common flavors produced as a result of the Maillard reaction include red meat, poultry, coffee, vegetables, alliums, bread crust and roasted notes. The main advantage of the reaction flavor is that it produces the characteristic meat, burnt, roasted, caramelized, or chocolate profiles desired by the food industry.

Other foods that benefit from one of the most important flavor-producing reactions in molecular gastronomy include pan-fried dumplings, toasted marshmallows, roasted garlic, fried donuts and more. Our expert chemists build flavor compounds that deliver the authentic taste of grilled, sautéed, roasted and seared meat — providing desired flavors for complex recipes.

ORGANIC   •   NATURAL   •   GLUTEN FREE   •   VEGAN   •   KOSHER   •   HALAL   •   NON-GMO   •   ALLERGEN FREE   •   DAIRY FREE   •   MASKING   •   MOUTHFEEL

The Maillard reaction is named after Louis-Camille Maillard, a French chemist who was studying the “browning effect” in 1912. Essentially, the Maillard reaction is responsible for the flavors and aromas created when food is heated enough that the amino acids (the building blocks of proteins) and carbohydrates (the building blocks of sugars) start to dance together, resulting in complex flavor that would be impossible without prolonged exposure to high heat. During the process, the surface of the food starts to brown and get crunchy. It develops a richness and depth of flavor and texture that cannot be produced by wet cooking methods like steaming or braising.

Maillard Reaction Flavors

The list of foods improved by the Maillard reaction is endless and different foods react in distinct ways. Both Filet Mignon and cookies undergo the Maillard reaction, but they look, smell, and taste vastly different from each other. Because of the Maillard reaction: steaks develop their richly flavorful surface; brisket builds a bark; crust forms on loaves of bread; dark beer gets a clandestine flavor; and beans are transformed into coffee and chocolate. These reactions are a chemical equation that equals mouthwatering results.

Maillard Reaction Flavors

What begins as a simple reaction becomes more complicated as the hundreds of different flavor compounds created during the reaction interact and break down to form yet more flavor compounds — all of which contribute to the taste and aroma of the food. Done right, the reward is beautiful food with maximum flavor. Common flavors produced as a result of the Maillard reaction include red meat, poultry, coffee, vegetables, alliums, bread crust and roasted notes. The main advantage of the reaction flavor is that it produces the characteristic meat, burnt, roasted, caramelized, or chocolate profiles desired by the food industry.

Other foods that benefit from one of the most important flavor-producing reactions in molecular gastronomy include pan-fried dumplings, toasted marshmallows, roasted garlic, fried donuts and more. Our expert chemists build flavor compounds that deliver the authentic taste of grilled, sautéed, roasted and seared meat — providing desired flavors for complex recipes.

ORGANIC   •   NATURAL   •   GLUTEN FREE   •   VEGAN   •   KOSHER   •   HALAL   •   NON-GMO   •   ALLERGEN FREE   •   DAIRY FREE   •   MASKING   •   MOUTHFEEL

Flavor Producing Reactions

What is the Difference Between the Maillard Reaction and Carmalization?

The Maillard reaction takes place only when both protein and carbohydrates (sugar) are present. Caramelization is exclusively carbohydrate (sugar) only.  Vegetables contain little or no protein, so technically they caramelize.

Flavor Producing Reactions

What is the Difference Between the Maillard Reaction and Carmalization?

The Maillard reaction takes place only when both protein and carbohydrates (sugar) are present. Caramelization is exclusively carbohydrate (sugar) only.  Vegetables contain little or no protein, so technically they caramelize.

Flavor Concepts

FLAVOR CATEGORIES

Alcoholic Flavors

ALCOHOLIC

Beverage Flavors

BEVERAGE

Botanical Flavors

BOTANICAL

Dairy Flavors

DAIRY

Fruity Flavors

FRUITY

International Flavors

INTERNATIONAL

Reaction Flavors

REACTION

Savory Flavors

SAVORY

Solutions Flavors

SOLUTIONS

Sweet Flavors

SWEET

Vanilla Flavors

VANILLA

Vegetable Flavors

VEGETABLE